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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
questioner tonight is jim lehrer. it's the 12th time he's served as moderator. >> lehrer: good evening. from the magnus arena at the university of denver in denver, colorado. i'm jim lehrer of the pbs newshour and i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president barack obama the democratic nominee and former massachusetts governor romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the next three-- two presidential, one vice presidential-- are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15-minute segments with two-minute answers for the first question. then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered suggestions on segment subjects or questions via the internet and other means but i made the final selections and, for the record, they were not submitted for approval to the commission or the candidates. the segments, as i announced in advance, will be three on the economy and one each on health car
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> the following is a pbs election event. funding for this program was provided by: >> ifill: good evening, and welcome to special pbs "newshour" coverage of the first presidential debate between president barack obama and former governor mitt romney. i'm again ifil. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight's debate will be moderated by our own jim leerer and will start a little over a minute from now, from the magness arena. >> after the debate we'll talked to arrow shapiro and scott horsily in denver, and christina bellantony. >> woodruff: you can follow along online on our live stream and live plog. two very quick thoughts from mark and david. mark, it come downs to this. >> in a rare race it's become increasingly a referendum on the challenger rather than the incumbent. can the challenger mitt romney make this a referendum on the president. >> who has the toughest job? >> romney. maybe jim lehrer. format i love. much more demanding on jim but better for us. >> ifill: we're looking forward to what jim has to say tonigh
countries. that's all for this edition of "newsline." thanks for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: at the united nations, israel's prime minister urged world leaders to draw a clear red line and stop iran's nuclear program. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get two views of benjamin netanyahu's speech in which he warned that tehran could be capable of making an atomic weapon next year. >> brown: then, was the attack on the u.s. mission in libya the work of al qaeda? we take a look.
administration did in two. by the way, we are winning those cases. >> jim lehrer moderates from the university of denver. watch followed by two ways to follow that the debate at 9:00. c-span 2, the multi camera version of the debate. following your reaction, calls, e-mails, twitter messages. >> a group of political fact checkers assessed claims made by president obama and mitt romney as the campaign ahead of their first debate. they were from people with the fact, the washington post, and the -- politifact, "the washington post," and [unintelligible] this is one-and-a-half hours. >> good morning. my name is kathleen hall jamieson. i direct the annenberg public policy center at university of pennsylvania. welcome to our session -- this includes sessions trying to address the question, what is the role of journalism in a debunking deceptions and holding candidates accountable? to set the fringe for our discussion, we are releasing the results of a survey of adults, with a margin of error of 3.2%. we will offer as our conclusion that the public has a lot to learn about the 2012 presidential race.
choice but to try to do it. we'll see where the help of jim lehrer, the moderator, exactly how he uses this moment. >> talk to you in a moment. whenever there's a big night involving politics, you can bet larry kudlow is involved. he's here on set with us. you were disappointed with mitt romney on the convention at large. is this a time to reform that. >> particularly on the economy and jobs. at the whole republican convention and mitt romney's speech set that campaign back several weeks in my opinion. they got no bump and no bounce. in fact, they probably got a negative bounce. so tonight it is incumbent on him to do two things. one is make the big picture. he's the free enterpriser and president obama is the big government planner. and those are big differences in philosophy in government. two, romney has a tax cut plan. he has a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for i
at center college in danville, kentucky. for now, from the university of denver, i'm jim lehrer, thank you and good night. [cheers and applause] neil: the first presidential debate is done, and the two men, did, in fact, bring it on. i'll let some of the pundits and others who we will not be interviewing tonight, but some of their respective supporters, the respective spouses give their congratulatory hugs, put the proper spin on it, but i do want to show you a phenomena that is unique in american politics after a debate of this magnitude. i want to switch to where i am now here in what they call the spin room. the spin began before these guys were even done. you could see florida senator marco rubio, who was here before the debate was even finished, talking to the press, no doubt, saying mitt romney had done very well. it's hard to sit here. if we can pull out, guys, or get a sense of the throng pushing in this room, but on the opposite side of the room -- if we can leave marco rubio and spin around if that's possible, there's a crush of republicans and democrats giving reporters their pe
's the moderator, jim lehrer of pbs. he's done a dozen of these. and the rules, which he will announce at the start, give him broad leeway to guide the conversation and the debate. it is a cold room in denver. the campaigns wanted the temperature low. and it's not likely to stay that way once we get under way. both men have been prepping for days. this happens to be the obamas' 20th wedding anniversary. moments ago we saw a warm embrace between mrs. romney and mrs. obama. they both met each other at the front of the hall. their hiss, this is the first of three meetings debate style between these candidates. even though voting is under way in 34 states. we'll throw it to the moderator. >> good evening from the magness arena at the university of denver in denver, colorado. i'm jim lehrer of the pbs news hour, and i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president barack obama, the democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the next three, two presidential, one vice presidential, are sponsored by the commission
that kind of undecided voter react. we're standing by, jim lehrer is the moderator, getting ready to ask the first question as a result of a flip of a coin, the president of the united states will get the first answer and the last word will go to mitt romney. here is jim lehrer. >> good evening at the magnus arena at the university of denver in denver, colorado. i'm jim lehrer of the pbs "news hour," and i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president barack obama, democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, republican nominee. the debates are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15-minute segments with two-minute answers for the first question, then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered suggestions on segment subjects or questions, via the internet and other means, but i made the final selections, and for the record, they were not submitted for appro
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: at the united nations, israel's prime minister urged world leaders to draw a clear red line and stop iran's nuclear program. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get two views of benjamin netanyahu's speech in which he warned that tehran could be capable of making an atomic weapon next year. >> brown: then, was the attack on the u.s. mission in libya the work of al qaeda? we take a look. >> woodruff: from our american graduate series, ray suarez reports on growing pains for north dakota schools brought on by the oil boom. >> i always make it very clear to any perspective teachers of what they are really getting themselves into. i tell them this is the new wild west. >> brown: on the "daily download," we examine how the candidates are using video games to push early voting. >> woodruff: and regular pro referees are back on the football field tonight after three weeks of questionable calls by replacements. we talk to npr's mike pesca about the deal struck with th
's debate, at the university of denver. chris, your last thoughts before we go to jim lehrer on the debate stage tonight with these two candidates? >> it's probably going to get down to, who do you like? it's as simple as that tonight. after all the talk, who do you like? >> i have to tell you that i think that the format tonight is going to be important. we are not expecting to hear a lot of cheering from this audience. it is not set up for that to be the expectation. we are not going to have buzzers. we are not going to have rigid time limits. it's going to be divided into sort of 15-minute chunks with these candidates. it is going to focus, they say, almost entirely on domestic policy. there's going to be specific time for health care. but this format gives these gentleman a chance to spread out a little bit. as these men have campaigned for the office and in mr. obama's case, held the office over these last four years, they have talked a lot about each other. but they have not faced each other, man to man, person to person, face to face, on the same stage, as far as i can tell, in eigh
to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> rose: welcome to the program. this evening we talk about one of the biggest global challenges of our time, it is clean water. first up, muhtar kent, the ceo of coca-cola company, gabriel jaramillo of the global fund and dean kamen of deka research. >> they can attempt to solve the problem, they can spend fund, time, effort and energy, butt the end of the day the problem that, the challenge can only really be sustainably solved if you bring the t
in their first presidential debate. the news hour's jim lehrer moderates from the university of denver. watch and engage with c-span, including our live debate preview at 7:00 p.m. eastern, the debate at 9:00, and post-debate, your reactions, calls, and emails and tweets. follow our live coverage on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span.org. >> september 11, 2001, was a day that changed my life forever. it changed america's life. i'm going to go through a power point presentation, which is going to outline the account, the historical account of the attack as things happened, as things transpired that day. it gets pretty intense. a lot of things happened very quickly. i'm going to do my best not to ramble on and go too fast, but i would ask to you sit back, clear your mind, put yourself in that room, and you'll get a real sense of what it was like to be at the top of the food chain, the national command authority, as a nation of 300 million americans was attacked by 19 al qaeda terrorists. >> more from retired lieutenant colonel robert darling, inside the president's bunker, this weekend
. >> you know what, i just think really that it's not really that fair that jim lehrer was the only guy with a teleprompter. you'll hear about that a lot probably, too. does that seem fair to you, that he's the only guy get as teleprompter? that was part of the problem. anyway, i guess we got to -- >> that teleprompter stuff is ridiculous. >> i know. i was just going to stick with the life lived without alcohol, you have a lot of brain cells, i was going to stick with that, but i can't help myself. >> just think how much better i'd be with you if i'd done the same thing. >> exactly. but i read like bill maher, there were -- the left abandons people so quickly if they get mad. i read from people, no, that complaint be really be him saying it. >> i think our colleagues on msnbc were pretty hot about it last night. >> that's what i mean. god bless them. all right. john harwood, thank you. >>> one day closer to the big jobs report from the government. today thursday's weekly jobless claims report. that hits the wires at 8:30. in the meantime, what's been happening in europe is that things h
, colorado. i'm jim lehrer of the "pbs news hour" i welcome you to the first of the presidential debates between president barack obama and former massachusetts governor mitt romney the republican nominee. this debate and the next three, two presidential, one vice presidential are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute segments, then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered discussion suggestions. i made the final selections. for the record they were not submitted for approval to the commission or the candidates. the segments as i announced in advance will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing. with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics and choices. both candidates will also have two minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain slinlt. no cheers, applause, boos, hisss among other noisy distracting thing
the madness arena at the university of colorado. im jim lehrer of the pbs "newshour." i welcome you to the 2012 debates between barack obama, the democratic nominee and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate in the next three, two presidential, one vice presidential are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues that will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute segment with two-minute answers for the first question, then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered suggestions on segment subjects or questions via the internet and other means, but i made the final selections. and for the record, they were not submitted for approval to the commission or the candidates. the segments as i announced in a van will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout the difference is, specific century says. both candidates will also have two-minute cl
. this one was moderated by jim lehrer. >> good evening from the magness president barack obama and the republican nominee mitt romney. how many of the have been in the hall for these debates before? so you although the rules. absolute silence. for those of you who have watched on television the primary debates know that is not the case. the rules are different here for the stevens. in the early days when i first started addressing the audience in the hall, i would say, you make no new or even applaud, cheer, i will turn it around and make you stand up and humiliate you in front of the whole world. i do not do that anymore because everybody knows the drill. certainly all of you do. you have come here for an important reason. most of you are here and are committed supporters. you know how important to this event is. it is important because it is about those millions and millions of people who will watch this even tonight. they are watching to make a decision on one of the most important decisions a citizen of this country makes. it behooves all of you and me, us in other words, t
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)